Chandler Malomlus Paa'ayat Stump | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: Six: Enuresis

I had completed the exercise translation but forgot to post it. thanks for helping

Lorraine Wilcox | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: Yíng Qì, Part 1

Well, I did use the term. My dissatisfaction is expressed only in the footnote. I guess the stems from the idea that sometimes it may be used as one of its other meanings so my dissatisfaction is that there is not one English term that can be used for it in all instances.

Nicolaas Herman Oving | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: Yíng Qì, Part 1

to provide with supplies - is not just one part of the meaning; it is the essence of how the word is used here - at least, that is my opinion. The 'concentrated essence' is providing the building blocks - and that is the meaning of 'to nourish', no?
However we see it, if we are not totally happy with a certain term choice, then the definition of that term will fill in the blanks.

Nicolaas Herman Oving | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: Six: Enuresis

Oh, sorry, this was supposed to go to comments... copied there... I don't know how to delete discussion items.

Nicolaas Herman Oving | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: Six: Enuresis

Okay, to prevent this page from going to sleep forever, I wrote up comments on the current translation:

Source: 
遗尿者,此由膀胱虚冷,不能约于水故也。膀胱为足太阳,肾为足少阴,二经为表里。

Translation: 
One who has enuresis, this is from urinary bladder weakness (xū) cold, therefore [the patient] cannot hold in water. The urinary bladder serves as the foot tàiyang, the kidney serves as the foot shǎoyīn, these two jīng serve as the outer and inner.
Comments on translation:
遗尿者 does not mean 'one who has enuresis' but 'enuresis'. 者 marks the topic/subject, and the 此 refers back to it.
虚 does not mean 'weakness'. 膀胱虚冷 = bladder vacuity cold / depletion cold if you wish
不能约 refers to the bladder - it is unable to contain water
This usage also occurs in: 肾虚不能摄约小便 vacuous kidney unable to contain urine
为 is better translated as 'constitutes' or simply 'is' here.
太阳 = greater yang
二经为表里 means that the two channels stand in exterior-interior relationship

肾主水,肾气下通于阴。小便者,水液之余也。
The kidney governs water, the kidney qì descends through the yīn. Urine is the remainder water-fluid of [kidney].
Comments on translation:
下通于阴 – below, it connects to the yin going down, it connects with yin is possible too I think.
水液 : water-humor. 'fluid' is good too.
余 : surplus compare for instance 发为血之余 the hair is the surplus of the blood
水液之余 : surplus of water-humor / surplus of fluid

膀胱为津液之腑,腑既虚冷,阳气衰弱,不能约于水,故令遗尿也。
The urinary bladder serves as the fǔ of bodily fluids; since the fǔ is both cold and vacuous, yáng qì is weak, [patient] is not able to hold water, hence this causes enuresis (bed-wetting).

膀胱为津液之府 bladder is the house of liquid and humor
府 can also be rendered as 'storehouse' – or 'bowel' / fu-organ / etc. (not my preference here)
It is based on
膀胱者.州都之官.津液藏焉 (Suwen 8)

Source: 
诊其脉来过寸口,入鱼际,遗尿。肝脉微滑,遗尿。
左手关上脉沉为阴,阴绝者,无肝脉也,苦遗尿。
其汤熨针石,别有正方,补养宣导,今附于后。
Translation: 
You examine the mài arrives excessively at the cùnkǒu [patient’s radial artery pulse], and enters at Fish Border (yújì), when there is bed-wetting (enuresis). The gānmài is small and slippery, when there is bed-wetting.
Comment on translation:
诊其脉来过寸口 means: [When] you examine the pulse [and find that] it arrives beyond (having passed by, having surpassed) the inch opening, then entering 鱼际fish's margin (thenar eminence) OR Fish Border (LU-10) (I think it is the first), [this indicates] enuresis. [If] the liver pulse is faint and slippery / OR slightly slippery / [this indicates] enuresis.

左手关上脉沉为阴,阴绝者,无肝脉也,苦遗尿。
On left side on top level of guān (middle pulse position) the mài is submerged like yin(?), its yin is vanished [on this level], no gānmài, [patient] suffers with bed-wetting.
Comment on translation:
左手关上脉沉为阴: A sunken pulse on the bar [position] of the left arm constitutes yin. In yin expiry there is no liver pulse and [the patient] suffers from enuresis.
Note that 遗尿 enuresis can mean 1. involuntary loss of urine and 2. involuntary loss of urine during sleep. For the last there is a specific term as well: 睡中遗尿 enuresis during sleep.

Nicolaas Herman Oving | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: Six: Enuresis

Hey, I just see this... thanks for making the effort, Lorraine. i will move it to comments.

Dan Tennenbaum | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: 06. Jīng and Blood

芥 jie could be translated as trifle things, like a mustard seed. The meaning of the sentence could be interpreted as all the seminal fluids, all the small and trifle parts such as sperm secretions have been discharged, yet the child resembles the mother and father.

Lorraine Wilcox | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: Yíng Qì, Part 1

It has such a wide range of meaning in Chinese, as I point out in the footnote and nourish is only one part of the meaning. But I still used nourish in the translation. It is a term that I am still pondering.

Nicolaas Herman Oving | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: Yíng Qì, Part 1

Lorraine, I have been thinking about why you are not satisfied with 'nourish' for the verbal use of 營.
'to provide with supplies' 'to provide nourishment' etc. all seem to apply, so I think it is impossible to find something better. I remembered this from other work I did, and found this note:
As verb in : 血不營心 'supply nourishment for' (Jingyue quanshu) 血不营筋; 血不营肌腠; 血不营经; 营气不营; 气不营则目不合; 冲任之脉,不营唇口,故须不生焉; 精氣竭則不營其四支; 脾不营运; 阳不营运; 土不营运; 胃气已绝; 不营五脏; see also Nanjing; also as passive (皮肤不营 etc.)

Lorraine Wilcox | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: Six: Enuresis

《养生方·导引法》云∶蹲踞高一尺许,以两手从外屈膝内入,至足趺上,急手握足五指,极力一通,令内曲入,利腰髋,治遗尿。
This is some kind of exercise. I don't understand it all.
蹲踞高一尺许 squat down until you are about one chi tall
以两手从外屈膝内入 use both hands to enter the bent knees from the outside?
至足趺上 until you reach the dorsum of the foot?
急手握足五指 quickly grasp the five toes with the the hands?
极力一通 using all your strength one time
令内曲入,利腰髋,???
治遗尿 to treat enuresis

Lorraine Wilcox | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: Fifty [Circuits of] Yíng), Part 1

Agreed, it appears this way from the earth. But I know eventually someone will protest that the sun doesn't travel around the earth. That footnote is a preemptive strike.

Dan Tennenbaum | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: Fifty [Circuits of] Yíng), Part 1

From the point of view of an observer on Earth, the sun does travel through the twenty-eight constellations as described.

Lorraine Wilcox | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: 02. Rooted Qì

Thanks! Hopefully I made it better.

Lorraine Wilcox | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: 02. Rooted Qì

Thanks. I still don't feel like I understand the sentence, but I can look more closely this weekend.

Nicolaas Herman Oving | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: 04. The Moistening of Fluids

Sorry, this should to comments...

Nicolaas Herman Oving | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: 04. The Moistening of Fluids

從---出 : exit from --- ; (is discharged via ---)

Nicolaas Herman Oving | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: 02. Rooted Qì

last section:
first part: I don't think these are admonitions so I would not use 'use' in front.
second part: 'qi enters and becomes' - maybe for the first instance this is okay, but not for the rest. qi enters and - then something happens. It is not qi that becomes something, it is the entering of qi that causes something.

Nicolaas Herman Oving | 4 years 3 months ago | Reply to: 02. Rooted Qì

統紀 = 2.頭緒;條理。 (Hanyu dacidian; this sentence is quoted as example there).

Lorraine Wilcox | 4 years 4 months ago | Reply to: 02. Rooted Qì

This is a very rough translation, but I have gone through the whole chapter. Any help would be appreciated. There are still a number of places where I am uncertain. Thanks!

Lorraine Wilcox | 4 years 4 months ago | Reply to: 02. Rooted Qì

In the second section this sentence gives me trouble: 疾證醫候,統紀浩繁,詳其本源。 Any insights?